Mapping patient pathways and cost of point of care versus standard testing and treatment for chlamydia and gonorrhoea in sexual health clinics

This study aimed to explore the current patient pathways for the diagnosis and treatment of chlamydia and gonorrhoea in England. We conducted workshops in four sexual health clinics, and asked them detail the steps and resources used in screening, diagnosis and treatment, and what would change if they had a point of care test (POCT) for chlamydia and gonorrhoea diagnosis. Using a POCT could lead to reduced clinical time and costs, and may lead to more appropriate and quicker care for patients.

Read Journal ArticleAdams EJ, Ehrlich A, Turner KME, et al. Mapping patient pathways and estimating resource use for point of care versus standard testing and treatment of chlamydia and gonorrhoea in genitourinary medicine clinics in the UK. BMJ Open 2014;4:e005322. doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2014-005322

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The cost-effectiveness of point of care tests for chlamydia and gonorrhoeae in sexual health clinics

Replacing standard laboratory tests for chlamydia and gonorrhoea with a rapid point of care test could be cost-effective if implemented in genitourinary medicine clinics in England. It could save the National Health Service an estimated £10 million annually, and patients would benefit from fewer unnecessary treatments and reduced complications from infection, and it could prevent the number of transmissions.

publication_iconTurner KME, Round J, Horner PJ, et. al. What are the clinical and economic costs and benefits of implementing point of care NAAT tests for Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae in genitourinary medicine clinics in England? Sex Transm Infect. Published online 22 Nov 2013: doi:10.1136/sextrans-2013-051147

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Cost effectiveness of screening for Chlamydia trachomatis in Ireland

In our analysis we estimated the cost and cost-effectiveness of opportunistic screening for Chlamydia trachomatis in Ireland, based on data from a pilot study. We found that a national screening programme would be expensive to implement nationally and would not be deemed cost-effective by policy makers in Ireland.

Journal ArticleGillespie P, O’Neill C, Adams E, et al. Cost effectiveness of opportunistic screening for Chlamydia trachomatis in Ireland. Sex Transm Infect 2012; 88:3, 222-228. doi:10.1136/sextrans-2011-050067

 

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Costs and cost-effectiveness of different strategies for chlamydia screening and partner notification

Comparing cost effectiveness and sex equity of different intervention strategies within the English National Chlamydia Screening Programme found that increasing the effectiveness of partner notification was more cost effective and increased the diagnoses in women compared to increasing screening in men. The tool developed in this study can be used with local data to calculate cost effectiveness for chlamydia control programmes.

publication_iconTurner KME, Adams EJ, Grant A, et al. Costs and cost effectiveness of different strategies for chlamydia screening and partner notification: an economic and mathematical modelling study. BMJ, 4;342:c7250, 2011. 10.1136/bmj.c7250.

 

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What is the cost of pelvic inflammatory disease and how much could be prevented by screening for chlamydia?

Data from a study of the incidence of pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) and healthcare behaviour were used to estimate the cost of managing PID and the potential impact of chlamydia screening. We found that the average cost of managing PID was £163 in community and hospital settings, and that over £60,000 could be saved in London alone from screening for chlamydia.

publication_iconAghaizu A, Adams EJ, Turner KME, et al. What is the cost of pelvic inflammatory disease and how much could be prevented by screening for Chlamydia trachomatis? Cost analysis of the POPI (prevention of pelvic infection) trial. Sex Transm Infect 2011; 87:312-317.

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